Supplies Needed to Care for the Flute
  1. Cleaning rod and small piece of lint-free cloth
  2. Clean cloth

Handling the Flute
The flute is a delicate and expensive instrument, which must be handled carefully. Do not let anyone else but your teacher play your flute. If you must set it down during rehearsal or during practice, put it on a flat surface with the keys up. Never leave your flute on a music stand. Be careful when playing the flute not to bang or bump it, as it will dent easily and these dents are difficult and expensive to remove.
  It is important to assemble your flute carefully because the key mechanism on the flute can be easily bent. This causes the flute to go out of adjustment and produce a poor quality sound. When you play your flute, be sure your fingers are positioned in the center of the keys, because poor hand position can also cause the keys to bend. 

Regular Maintenance
 About once a month wash the head joint with lukewarm (room temperature) soapy water. Never use silver polish or any other cleaner on your flute. This can scratch the finish and ruin the pads.
  Do not touch the key adjustment screws. These are for adjustments by your teacher or a repair person only.
  Under each key is a pad that seals the tone hold when the key closes. If pads stick, they are dirty. To clean the pads, place a clean cloth (muslin works well) under the pad, close the key, and pull the cloth through. To keep pads clean, don’t eat candy or chew gum before playing! Pads can and should be replaced after several years of use, but this is expensive, so make them last as long as possible.

When You Have Finished Playing
 Every time you finishing playing your flute, swab it out before you put it away. Your flute comes with a cleaning rod. Thread a small piece of lint-free cloth through the slot in the cleaning rod, and twist the cloth over the end of the rod and around it. Cover as much of the rod as possible so it won’t scratch the inside of the flute. Use the rod to swab out each section of your flute before you put it into its case.
 Wipe the keys with a cloth to remove finger marks and acid left by perspiration. This acid will tarnish the metal if it isn’t removed.
 Always keep your flute in its case when you are not playing it. Never put anything in your case that it was not designed to hold. The pressure from papers or music in your case can bend the rods and keys. Several times a year, vacuum your case out. Keeping the case dust-free will help keep the dust out of your instrument. 

Supplies Needed to Care for the Clarinet
  1. Swab
  2. Clean cloth
  3. Cork grease
  4. Absorbent paper, such as lens paper
  5. Mouthpiece brush

Regular Maintenance
  Try to keep dust from accumulating in the key mechanism of the clarinet. If you are extremely careful, you can use a small brush or cotton swab to clean under the keys and rods. If this is not done with great care, springs could be pushed out of place, or bent.
  Do not polish the keys. Use a cloth to wipe off moisture and finger marks after playing.
  Under each key is a pad that seals the tone hole when the key closes. If pads stick, they are dirty. To clean the pads, place a piece of absorbent paper, such as lens paper for cleaning camera lenses, under the pad, close the key and pull the paper through. To keep pads clean, don’t eat candy or chew gum before playing! Pads can and should be replaced after several years of use, but this is expensive, so make them last as long as possible. 
  Wash the mouthpiece regularly with lukewarm (room temperature) water and clean it using a mouthpiece brush.

Handling the Clarinet
  The clarinet is a delicate instrument, which must be handled carefully. Do not let anyone else but your teacher play your clarinet. If you must set it down during rehearsal or during practice, put it on a flat surface with the keys up. Never leave your clarinet on a music stand. Be careful when playing the clarinet not to bang or bump it. The clarinet is an expensive instrument – not a toy – and should be handled with care.

When You Have Finished Playing
  Moisture left in the instrument after you have finished playing will cause the pads to deteriorate. Swab your clarinet each time you finish playing. There are two kinds of swabs available for the clarinet. The most common is a cloth attached by a string to a weight. The weight is dropped through each section and the cloth is pulled through. The other kind of swab is a brush type that is pushed through each section.
  Wipe the keys with a cloth to remove finger marks and acid left by perspiration. This acid will tarnish the metal if it isn’t removed.
  Remove your reed from the mouthpiece and place it in a reed guard. This will extend the life of the reed. Swab out the mouthpiece. Leave the ligature on the mouthpiece to keep it from getting bent, and be sure to replace the mouthpiece cover on the mouthpiece.
  Always keep your clarinet in its case when you are not playing it. Never put anything in your case that it was not designed to hold because the pressure from papers or music in your case can bend the rods and keys. Several times a year, vacuum your case out. Keeping the case dust-free will help keep the dust out of your instrument.

Supplies Needed to Care for the Trumpet

  1. Valve oil
  2. Slide grease
  3. Mouthpiece brush
  4. Soft cloth
  5. Snake brushes
  6. Valve casing brush or cleaning rod and cloth

General Information
  The moisture that accumulates inside the trumpet is not “spit.” It is condensation from the player’s breath – just like the moisture from a steaming kettle that condenses on windows. When this moisture accumulates inside the trumpet, it makes it gurgle and has to be released through the water key or spit valve. Open the water key and blow air (don’t buzz) into the instrument. Empty your spit valve onto the floor or into a garbage can.
  If your mouthpiece gets stuck while you are playing, do not attempt to remove it yourself or have anyone yank it out for you. Forcibly removing a stuck mouthpiece can break the braces on a trumpet. Carry the trumpet to your teacher (it won’t fit into your case) and he or she will remove it with a tool made specifically for removing mouthpieces. To prevent stuck mouthpieces, always insert the mouthpiece gently, don’t pop it during rehearsal, and don’t use too much pressure while you play. Keep the shank of the mouthpiece and the receiver clean.

Before You Play
  There is very little to assemble on a trumpet. All you have to do is place the mouthpiece into the lead pipe. Do this with a gently twisting motion. Do not hit or pop the mouthpiece into place. This can lead to a stuck mouthpiece. Oil the valves every day  you play your trumpet or every second day. Remove the valves one at a time and apply three or four drops of high quality valve oil. Replace the valve, slotting it into place. If the valve is not in the proper position, you can blow hard, but no air will go through the horn. If this happens, check the position of each of the valves to correct the problem

Handling the Trumpet
  When you are playing the trumpet, hold it by the valve casings, not by the slides or the bell. Don’t lay the trumpet down on a music stand or a chair or stand it on the floor on its bell. The trumpet will dent easily. Dents look ugly, affect the tone of the instrument, and are expensive to remove. Always put the trumpet in its case correctly.
Never set the trumpet in its case with the bell hanging over the edge. Anyone accidentally closing the case on a trumpet left like this will crinkle the bell. Don’t cram books and music into your trumpet case because the pressure on the tubing can cause damage.

Regular Maintenance
  A clean trumpet works and sounds better than a dirty one. Once a week clean the mouthpiece with warm water and a mouthpiece brush. Help keep the mouthpiece and instrument clean by avoiding gum, candy and pop before you play. Rinse your mouth out if you have been eating anything sweet.
 Once a month give your trumpet a bath. Take all the slides out and the bottom caps off. Take the valves out one at a time and lay them in order on a clean towel. This will help you to put them back in the correct order when you have finished. Put the slides and the body of the trumpet into lukewarm (room temperature) soapy water. Run snake brushes through all the tubes. Use a valve casing brush or a cleaning rod and cloth to clean the valve casings. Rinse them off in clean lukewarm (room temperature) water. Wash the valves thoroughly, checking that no lint, dirt, or other substance remains in the ports (holes). Be sure to keep the felt from getting wet. Wipe the water off the outside of the horn. Don't leave the instrument in the water too long or the lacquer finish can peel off.
  Put the trumpet back together. Oil the valves and grease the slides. For slide lubrication, you can use petroleum jelly, anhydrous lanolin or commercial slide grease. Wipe off excess grease. If you have a trumpet with a push-type water key, apply a few drops of oil to keep it lubricated. This type of water key can break off if it is forced open. A drop of oil once a month is a pound of cure for this problem.

When You Have Finished Playing 
  After playing, wipe the instrument clean with a soft cloth.  This will remove perspiration, which can damage the lacquer and metal.  Do not use polish on lacquered instruments because it can scratch the finish. Be sure the mouthpiece and other accessories are put away properly so they don’t jar loose and cause damage. Remember that the trumpet is an expensive instrument - not a toy - and should always be handled with care.

Supplies Needed to Care for the Trombone

  1. Slide oil or cream
  2. Slide grease
  3. Mouthpiece brush
  4. Soft cloth
  5. Snake brush
  6. Cleaning rod and cheesecloth
  7. Spray bottle filled with distilled water

Before You Play
  There is very little to assemble on a trombone. All you have to do is place the mouthpiece into the lead pipe. Do this with a gently twisting motion. Do not hit or pop the mouthpiece into place. This can lead to a stuck mouthpiece. When attaching the slide to the bell section, make sure you don’t move the bell section too close to the slide. You need room for your hand to move and to prevent the bell from hitting the slide, which can result in a dent. Always leave the slide locked when you put your horn down or in the case!
  Proper cleaning and lubrication of the main slide is essential to the playing of the trombone. Each time you play, clean the outer slide using a cleaning rod wrapped in cheesecloth. Wipe off the inner slide and apply either slide oil or slide cream to each of the tubes. 
If slide cream is used, use only a small amount. Melt it between your fingers. Put it mostly on the stockings (the bottom ends). Put the outer slide on one side at a time and work the slide cream in by moving the slide back and forth as well as up and down. Remove any excess. Spray the slide with distilled water from a spray bottle. Spray the slide often during your practice or rehearsal.

General Information
  The moisture that accumulates inside the trombone is not “spit.” It is condensation from the player’s breath – just like the moisture from a steaming kettle that condenses on windows. When this moisture accumulates inside the trombone, it makes it gurgle and has to be released through the water key or spit valve. Open the water key and blow air (don’t buzz) into the instrument. Empty your spit valve onto the floor or into a garbage can.
  If your mouthpiece gets stuck while you are playing, do not attempt to remove it yourself or have anyone yank it out for you. Forcibly removing a stuck mouthpiece can break the braces on a trombone. Carry the trombone to your teacher (it won’t fit into your case) and he or she will remove it with a tool made specifically for removing mouthpieces. To prevent stuck mouthpieces, always insert the mouthpiece gently, don’t pop it during rehearsal, and don’t use too much pressure while you play. Keep the shank of the mouthpiece and the receiver clean.

Regular Maintenance
  A clean trombone works and sounds better than a dirty one. Once a week clean the mouthpiece with warm water and a mouthpiece brush. Help keep the mouthpiece and instrument clean by avoiding gum, candy and pop before you play. Rinse your mouth out if you have been eating anything sweet.
  Once a month give your trombone a bath. Take the trombone completely apart. Soak all the parts in lukewarm (room temperature) soapy water. Run a snake brush or a cleaning rod through all the tubes.  Rinse all the parts in clean lukewarm (room temperature) water. Wipe the water off the outside of the horn. Don’t leave the instrument in the water too long or the lacquer finish can peel off.
Put the trombone back together. Grease the tuning slide. For tuning-slide lubrication, you can use petroleum jelly, anhydrous lanolin, or commercial slide grease. Wipe off excess grease.

Handling the Trombone
  The trombone will dent easily. Dents look ugly, affect the tone of the instrument, and are expensive to remove. Dents in the main slide are a trombonist’s nightmare. Smooth slide action is absolutely essential to good trombone playing. Even a small dent in the main slide will hamper the slide action.
  The trombone slide is a terrific weapon to use on fellow students in the band rehearsal. By extending the slide you can poke a student sitting three feet away. Resist the temptation! Misusing the slide to poke people, or leaning on the slide when it is resting on the floor, is asking for dents. Always remember to lock your slide when you are not using it. Always put the trombone into its case correctly. Don’t cram books and music into your case because the pressure on the tubing can cause damage.

When You Have Finished Playing
  After playing, wipe the instrument clean with a soft cloth.  This will remove perspiration, which can damage the lacquer and metal.  Do not use polish on lacquered instruments because it can scratch the finish. Be sure the mouthpiece and other accessories are put away properly so they don’t jar loose and cause damage.  Remember that the trombone is an expensive instrument – not a toy – and should always be handled with care.

 

Supplies Needed to Care for the Euphonium/Baritone

  1. Valve oil  
  2. Slide grease
  3. Mouthpiece brush  
  4. Soft cloth
  5. Snake brushes
  6. Valve casing brush or cleaning rod and cloth

General Information
 The moisture that accumulates inside the euphonium is not “spit.”  It is condensation from the player’s breath – just like the moisture from a steaming kettle that condenses on windows. When this moisture accumulates inside the euphonium, it makes it gurgle and has to be released through the water key or spit valve.  Open the water key and blow (don’t buzz) into the instrument.  Empty your spit valve onto the floor, not on your chair or your neighbor’s shoe!
 If your mouthpiece gets stuck while you are playing, do not attempt to remove it yourself or have anyone yank it out for you.  Forcibly removing a stuck mouthpiece can break the braces on a euphonium.  Carry the euphonium to your teacher (it won’t fit into your case) and he or she will remove it with a tool made specially for pulling mouthpieces.  To prevent stuck mouthpieces, always insert the mouthpiece gently, don’t pop it during rehearsal, and don’t use too much pressure when you play.  Keep the shank of the mouthpiece and the receiver clean.

Regular Maintenance
 A clean euphonium works and sounds better than a dirty one.  Once a week clean the mouthpiece with warm water and a mouthpiece brush.  Help keep the mouthpiece and instrument by avoiding gum, candy, and pop before you play.  Rinse your mouth if you have been eating anything sweet.
  Once a month give your euphonium a bath.  Take all the slides out and the bottom caps off.  Take all the valves out one at a time and lay them in order on a towel.  This will help you to put them back in the correct order when you have finished.  Put the slides and the body of the euphonium into lukewarm soapy water.  Hot water will damage the lacquer on your instrument.  Run snake brushes through all the tubes.  Use a valve casing brush or a cleaning rod and cloth to clean the valve casings. Rinse them off in clean lukewarm water.  Wash the valves thoroughly, checking that no lint, dirt or other substance remains in the ports (holes).  Take care not to get any felt wet.  Wipe the water off the outside of the horn.  Don’t leave the instrument in the water too long or the lacquer finish can peel off.
  Put the euphonium back together.  Oil the valves and grease the slides.  For slide lubrication you can use petroleum jelly, anhydrous lanolin or commercial slide grease.  Wipe off excess grease.  If you have a euphonium with a push-type water key, apply a few drops of oil to keep it lubricated.  This type of water can break off if it is forced open.  A drop of oil once a month is a pound of cure for this problem.

Handling the Euphonium
  When you are playing the euphonium, hold it by the valve casings, not by the slides or the bell. Don’t lay the euphonium down on a music stand or a chair or stand it on the floor on its bell.  The euphonium will dent easily.  Dents look ugly, affect the tone of the instrument, and are expensive to remove.  Always put the euphonium in its case correctly.  Never set the euphonium in its case with the bell hanging over the edge.  Anyone accidentally closing the case on a euphonium left like this will crinkle the bell.  Don’t cram books and music into your euphonium case because the pressure on the tubing can cause damage. 

When You Have Finished Playing
 After playing, wipe the instrument clean with a soft cloth.  This will remove perspiration, which can damage the lacquer and metal.  Do not use polish on lacquered instruments because it can scratch the finish. Be sure the mouthpiece and other accessories are put away properly so they don’t jar loose and cause damage.  Remember that the euphonium is an expensive instrument – not a toy – and should always be handled with care.